Bondage Restraints Guide: How to Tie Someone Up?

Bondage Restraints Guide: How to Tie Someone Up?

It's easy to have fun while tying someone up, and it's much easier to have fun after being tied up. But what if you're looking for something more elaborate than just attaching them to the bed frame? Your bed could be difficult to bind someone to if you don't have a lot of room. Suppose you don't have a lot of room in your home for toys. When it comes to the bedroom, nothing beats a rope.

Safety

With that out of the way, let's go through some critical safety guidelines when using rope to tie someone or restrict their movement. Rope play is not something to be taken lightly. A severe injury or perhaps death might result from it.

Tension: Make sure you get one finger between the rope and your tying partner's skin when tightening.

Neck: To prevent placing rope over the front of the neck. Major blood vessels and the airway are located close to each other. In this case, it's essential to prevent any restriction.

Rope size:  Damage may be caused by ropes with diameters as small as 5 mm. At least 5mm is recommended. It's recommended to use hemp or soft cotton for this purpose.

Length: It's essential to keep in mind that going longer doesn't always mean better; it might put you in danger. Each of the knots I choose to provide comes with a suggested length size.

Scissors: Always have a pair of safety shears on standby if you can't undo your partner's knot or if they are in trouble and you need to get them out fast. They can't be replaced, but a rope is.

Rope Placement: The ropes are always placed level on the skin to prevent bruising.

In addition to any possible medical issues, there are a few more things to consider. Pressure points, significant blood vessels, and critical nerve locations are all included in this list.

Rope Dictionary

You'll need to learn a few terms before diving into the exciting world of rope bondage. As you read and watch tutorials, you'll come across these phrases repeatedly. There are various names for these knots, but they're all interchangeable. As a Scout or rope enthusiast, you've heard these terms before.

The following is a brief list of words you'll come across:

Bottom: The person being tied up. Usually, they are submissive.

Top: The person who ties up. We may also call them as ''dominant''

Loop: It is a loop when two ropes cross. You can do this when you can't access the bight.

Working End: The loose end of the rope used to tie the knot.

Standing End: The loose end of the rope not being used to tie the knot. 

Elbow: This is the elbow when you have two or more loops near each other.

Bight: It is the middle part of the rope between the ends. It’s the bend that you run the ends of the rope through. 

Bondage Styles

Shibari and Western rope bonding are the two main types of rope bonding. Shibari is a lovely kind of bondage that originated in Japan to humiliate and restrain criminals. The knots are more about how the rope is presented on the person who is being tied than the knots themselves. The rope looping is elaborate and systematic, yet it is simple to remove. When performing Shibari, you must need a very special rope.

However, Western bondage is a hybrid that incorporates the aesthetic value of knots. In contrast, the bottom is held in place in the Western type by a wider usage of whatever rope is at hand. It doesn't even have to be a rope to get the job done. Use what you have on hand.

Playing alone with rope is quite OK if you'd want to experiment with the material. Self-bondage was well-documented on Youtube, with dozens of videos available. Solo rope play allows you to practice new bindings before using them on someone else.

You have the option of sensual self-bondage on either side. Rather than the knots themselves, this is all about the psychological thrill of being bound

Knot: Lark's Head and a Double Lark’s Head

How much rope is required: N/A

The purpose of this knot is to extend the rope. Undoing it is also simple. This knot might be used as part of a larger and more complex restraining system.

Restricted body part:  Depending on how the knot is used. Despite its simplicity, you may use it to tie knots of varying degrees of complexity.

Knot: Chest Harness Body Harness

How much rope is required: a rope that is 30 feet long

Rather than tying a knot, this is more like tying a full restriction. A chest harness is intended to demonstrate the Top's superiority over the Bottom physically. Breasts are also highlighted in this design. As a result, the Top has a place to grab and control the Bottom.

Restricted body part: The arms may also be included with a chest harness. Body harnesses may be worn around the hips and groin area. 

Knot: Handcuff Knot

How much rope is required: The length of rope required for this knot is 15 feet.

Hand ties are made simple with this knot. There are a few half-hitches involved in this method.

Restricted body part: If you're looking for a way to keep your hands under control, this is the tool for you.

Knot: Reverse Tension

How much rope is required: We recommend 30 feet of rope as a starting point for this rope. 

In this case, the term "knot" refers to something that isn't truly a knot. It's as simple as pulling tension in the opposite direction of the rope wrapped around the Bottom while running the working end through the bight. You may use it with single or double-column ties, harnesses, and other items.

Restricted body part: Again, you may utilize this in various ways. Your imagination only limits this one.

Knot: Cinch (or the single column tie) 

How much rope is required: When it comes to the length of this rope, the outcome of the bind will determine how much is required. We recommend going as far as 15 feet if necessary.

You may use this foundation knot for a wide range of additional binding and restraining purposes. It works well for attaching the bed's base to the headboard and footboard.

Restricted body part: With this one, the possibilities are endless. Wrists, ankles, legs, and arms may benefit from this style.

Knot: In-line Cuff

How much rope is required: For the in-line cuff, you'll need 30 feet of rope.

When you can't tie a new bight and need to bind legs, this is a great knot to have on hand. Complex rope structures may benefit from its utilization.

Restricted body part: When binding the legs, this knot is handy.

Knot: Friction

How much rope is required: 30 feet.

Friction on the rope keeps this one in place, not friction on the body. It is critical to keep the rope in its original position to ensure safety.  This is a basic knot that may be seen on various huge rope constructions.

Restricted body part: The Top may use this to restrain any area of the Bottom's body as desired.

Knot: Half Hitch

How much rope is required: Depending on the final knot, a minimum of 30 feet is recommended.

This knot's primary use is to secure the ends of a rope. You may use it to attach your bottom to a piece of furniture with ease. It's simple to untie, and it's a knot with a lot of friction.

Restricted body part: Any part that will be attached to a piece of furniture or other construction.

Knot: Futomomo

The length of the rope required will vary depending on the size of the Bottom's arms and legs.

It uses just cinches and a single-column tie, making it simple to apply.  It's possible to reposition the knot for those with limited flexibility  The Bottom's legs or arms are held in place by the Futomomo knot. The Top may now get entry. Other restraint ties may also be used to confine the arms and legs in a fixed posture.

Restricted body part: This may be used to bind either the legs or arms. 

Knot: Sling

How much rope is required: For this style, you'll need two 15-foot lengths of rope.

This one sounds like a lot of fun. Using the sling, the Bottom is spread open and restrained. Initially, the ankle is tied to the thigh, and the rope is stretched over the opposite shoulder, under the arm, and around the other arm.

Restricted body part: The legs and ankles are connected to the torso. According to your preferences, you may also bind the Bottom's hands together or to the side. It's up to the dealer

Knot: Ankle to Wrist

How much rope is required: Two 15-foot lengths.

It's like wearing cuffs clipped together at the ankle and wrist. The Top gets easy access to all of the crucial regions thanks to the ankle to wrist knot, while the Bottom is at their mercy.

Restricted body part: The ankle and wrist are tied together on the same side of the body.

Knot: Spreader Bar

How much rope is required: You will need 25-40 feet of rope.

This is an excellent cheaper alternative to the more costly metal spreader bars. The spreader's purpose is to prevent the Bottom or Sub from closing their arms or legs. With this one, the Top has complete control. The wrists of the bottom are positioned between the legs, parallel to the ankles, and roped together in a spread-eagle posture.

Restricted part of the body: Arms and feet are restricted similarly to a typical spreader bar.

Knot: Mermaid Tie

How much rope is required: 50 feet of rope is required.

The main goal of this restraining knot is to be a beautiful restraining knot. It just prevents the legs from moving. The Top has complete control over the Bottom's leg positioning.

Restricted part of the body: The legs are restrained anywhere from the hip to the ankles with this bind.

Knot: Dog tie

How much rope is required: You'll need four 15-foot rope lengths.

The purpose of this tie is identical to that of a hogtie, except that the bottom is ass up, face down. They may be turned over and attached to various objects. The Top has easy access to whatever entrance they want in this position.

Restricted part of the body: The ankles, wrists, legs, and arms are restrained by this bind.

Conclusion

Some people find it frightening to see somebody suspended and sometimes tied so tightly in a chest harness that their breasts become purple. You now know that everything has been well thought out and arranged. And, like with any BDSM game, you start little and work your way up.